Pontiac Electric Division

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Would you own an American made auto that could do 350 miles on one charge and recharge in 1hr?

Poll ended at February 14th, 2021, 8:38 am

No gasoline power for me even if those parameter were met.
2
40%
Sure, a reasonably priced mid size or full sized American car would work for me.
2
40%
Would you like to see a full line of Pontiac cars with battery power?
1
20%
The idea of a Pontiac specific division is crazy--ain't gonna happen.
0
No votes
 
Total votes: 5

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Admin
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Pontiac Electric Division

Post by Admin »

Pontiac Electric Division. GM has an opportunity (IMO) to restart the old PMD with a research and development outfit to come up with a reasonably priced mid and full sized car that runs on battery provided electric. To me the biggest problem with battery power is the number of miles the car can go on a full charge at 70 miles per hour. If going on a trip, the mileage should be close to 350 miles averaging 55-60 miles per hour. Charging the battery to full power should be 1 hour or less with 15% of battery life left.

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Thanks,

Bill Boyle
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tjs44
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Re: Pontiac Electric Division

Post by tjs44 »

I would buy one but need more miles,at least 500.Tom

JayS.
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Re: Pontiac Electric Division

Post by JayS. »

If it was something like a Tesla. Performance wise, with that 350 mile distance, I like the thought of it. If it is something like a Volt, UGH. No thanks.

I wonder how many times I would have to charge it to get to the 350,000 mile my Yukon XL has. :lol:

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Admin
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Re: Pontiac Electric Division

Post by Admin »

Jay, I was thinking more in line with an F-body sized car or an Impala sized sedan platform and a a few crossover type SUVs. No Volt sized cars or smaller. Their mileage range would probably not meet the criteria. All would be 12 second cars for sure (or quicker). The cars would have to priced competitively with the gasoline platforms of Buick, Chevrolet and Cadillac.

Bill
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rkellerjr
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Re: Pontiac Electric Division

Post by rkellerjr »

Electric cars are very hard on the environment, from making them to getting rid of the batteries when they need replacing. They are also expensive to replace.
Rich
1975 TA - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCENVXA ... zhw/videos
When you turn your car on does it return the favor

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Re: Pontiac Electric Division

Post by Admin »

Rich, the process of making batteries has always been anti-environment. With the modern lithium type batteries I believe the biggest risk is fire, more so than with gasoline engines. Since I don't know anyone driving a Telsa or other electric vehicle (other than golf carts) I can only speculate that once batteries fail and ignite, the fire spreads like lightning and fire engine company must have the ability to put them out. A lot of things would need to be put in place aside from the vehicle. Charging stations on the road and charging stations at apartments, condos, townhouses and single family homes would have to be installed. Charging stations in the boonies would have to be powered by electric to them or heaven forbid fossil fuel (Diesel?). There's problems that need to be solved and smart engineers are needed to solve them.

I would drive a new TA with electric and figure out what it would take to install electric service so it could be plugged in at night to keep the charge up at the house. A dedicated line for sure.

The car would have to be engineered so that new batteries could be replaced every 40k miles (let's say) and that the cost would not be horrific for parts and labor to do the job. Battery failure at less than 40k miles would be a warranty situation--battery and labor--that is, no charge to the owner.

Anyway, I could go on and on, and agree there are many, many issues to solve before electric cars from any GM division past or present could earn the customer's faith in them. Maybe we should consider Dilithium crystals as a power source...what do you think Spock. :D
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rkellerjr
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Re: Pontiac Electric Division

Post by rkellerjr »

Hahaha, ya, I like that. I guess I'm not on board with all this global warming nonsense but, don't want to get into that here on a car forum. I don't mind people driving them if that's what they want for sure.
Rich
1975 TA - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCENVXA ... zhw/videos
When you turn your car on does it return the favor

tjs44
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Re: Pontiac Electric Division

Post by tjs44 »

I read somewhere that GM was going to make a EV conversion for 1/2 ton trucks avail.Tom

JayS.
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Re: Pontiac Electric Division

Post by JayS. »

I think it is a cool idea to have a electric vehicle branch of GM to carry the Pontiac name. Electric cars are neat in there own way. The tq that the wheel motors make gives them unbelievable acceleration. They have the same tq off the line as they do at full speed. Some of the hybrid super cars that have harnessed both internal combustion and electric power the performance is mind blowing. Ya baby...Pontiac Trans am Hybrid super car 8-)

Some folks believe (or want to believe) the electric car’s are going to totally take over very soon, or overtake the sales of our old petroleum guzzlers. I was talking to a friend that said one of his relatives insists that everything will be electric driven in a few years, even our construction and farm equipment. Hmmm, better be a big battery. Some of our bigger machinery will use 20 gals of diesel fuel per hr, on board fuel capacity is about 300 gallons.

Last week during a historic cold snap, it pretty much illustrated how far we are from the electric car replacing petro transportation. Our power grid here in Nebraska stretches into Oklahoma and very Northern Texas and goes north up to North Dakota. The local Utilities has a handfull of large piston engine generators they can turn on and use as peaking units. Normally the utility district gets paid about $50 per MW-hr to run them...I.e...they get paid $50 to put power out on the grid. Problem is it takes roughly $110 MW-hr to run them. So they almost never run them.

The weekend before this cold snap in February they got and alert saying anyone that had power generating capabilities needed to be online and making power. The power grid and the cost or payment to the power companies is largely based off of demand. I think some sort of algorithm calculated who gets what, and what the price is. Over that weekend the power that those generators make went from $50 ish $MW-HR, to $2400 MW-hr. In itself, that is interesting to have such a spike. Then to complicate matters, the generators, which normally run on natural gas had to be ran Diesel becuase the cold weather took all the natural gas for heating. There was not enough natural gas in the pipe line left to run the generators, it was being used for heating. Even more interesting was the cost spike when the brunt of the cold weather came in. By Monday the price for electricity spiked at that plant to over $9000 MW-hr! You think it would not go higher than that right??? Later that day the price went past $40000 MW-h in my region. At the very peak it I heard it hit roughly 53000. :o That is what our demand based grid system did to the cost of electricity for a short time. Are you seeing any issue with an electric car yet? Here in Nebraska a lot of irrigation systems are now electrics, they make it work by shutting the power off during peak usage. Hmmm...How long are you willing to wait to charge your car to save a buck....

A typically electric car cost roughly $9 to recharge the battery at $130 MW-h. What would happen if you, let’s say, had no idea there was an issue on the grid going on, were on a direct point to point system and happened to plug your new electric car in at the high point of that shortage we just had. Your electric car would cost a little over $3700 to charge up. Ugh! I realize all of us on the electric grid will pay for this spike in the electrical cost, they will likely average it out some how. But it illustrates fairly well how our electrical grid, at times, is barely getting by.


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Red Horse
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Re: Pontiac Electric Division

Post by Red Horse »

I just read an article about service requirements, EV chargers require a 75 amp outlet. Since most residences have a 100 amp service you probably would exceed your service capacity when using house hold appliances . According to the article I there would need to be whole sale upgrades of residential areas .
Then there is the problem with having enough charging outlets at charge stations. New Years 2019 there were cars lined up for recharging coming back from Vegas to Cal. Some waited several hours to be recharged .
Lets say you have 6 charging points at a road side charging station. That's only six cars per hour, very slow compared to a gas pump. If there are millions of EV vehicles on the road the power grid would need a major overhaul, which should be started now . Wind and solar can't provide the needed energy .Lets not forget we also have our industrial plant to supply energy to . Nuclear is the way to go but we know that won't happen. And another thing a fossil fuel back up is required for those cloudy windless days.
I vote for fossil fuel, its more reliable .

And thanks Bill finally able to post again .

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